Mission trip reflections – By Mary Ann Aiken

This year I went on my second mission trip. As a youth group, we really put in a lot of hard work to raise money for the trip, so I want to thank the congregation for participating in our events and buying bagels at coffee hour! With your help, this year’s trip was an amazing experience that none of us will forget. Since I have already been on mission trip, I could really tell that a different group of people will change the feel of the overall trip. There were so many people there that we had not gotten to see for a whole year, and plenty of new people too! Over the trip our theme was “trust” and I really felt that a big sense of trust was built throughout the entire group. I feel that this will bring us even closer together during youth group time downstairs.

On this trip, we started a few big projects and got to finish them and see how people reacted. This was really cool since last year we never really got to do a project from start to finish. At one house, a woman and her husband needed a new ramp because theirs was really worn down. They had a couple steps in the beginning which were getting harder and harder to go down as they got older. Within six hours they had a brand new ramp leading all the way down the driveway and down to the lawn. They were so appreciative and the woman was just so incredibly happy. She even took pictures of us working. They were such kind people and I so glad that our group was able to help them out.

We also worked on a family’s roof. We took off old shingles and replaced them with new ones. The family was very grateful to have us there and everyone was just extremely dedicated to this project.

It was a big task to handle but everyone was willing to help out and make these people’s lives better. Once all of the projects were finished, we felt truly inspired and that we could really make a difference in these people’s lives. It was just an incredible experience and I am sure none of us will forget it.

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First Unitarian Society of Milwaukee  is a home for spiritual community, social justice, and intellectual freedom, active in Milwaukee since 1842. Unitarian Universalism is an inclusive denomination; core principles include recognition of the worth and dignity of every person; respect for the interdependent web of existence; and the goal of world peace, liberty and justice.